I often explore the capabilities of my art materials. I’m also interested in how they are made and where they come from.

H is for Hue

The Munsell Color System was created by Professor Albert Munsell in the early 20th century.

G is for Grey

Recently, greys have been a little baffling for me. Grey has always been a mix of black and white, but for anyone who has been looking at colour theory, as I have, will discover that the theory says that if you mix complementary colours (those opposite on the colour wheel) you will get a grey.

This is news to me. I’d always considered those colours to be browns, often very useful browns, but the literature says they are greys (or grays if you prefer the traditional American spelling).

F is for Flesh

I have to say that the title of this post is a little creepy. But no, we are talking the colour of flesh, one of the most challenging colours to create, particularly if you are painting caucasian.

E is for Earth

When I was a kid we had some friends who were building a house not far from an old quarry. Being kids we played in the quarry which was literally dripping with clay deposits (it was winter, there was rain, and can we say mud?). Little did I know that I was playing with the raw ingredients of the paints I would end up painting with as an adult. There were several different colours and I had the time of my life getting myself coated in them. The quarry is gone now, eaten by housing estates, but it would be fun to go back and look at those colours and wonder.

D is for Dioxazine Purple

When I first threw Dioxazine Purple into Google I was very surprised at the lack of information that popped up. I was thinking, hey, this is my favourite purple, a stunning purple beloved by many artists, why isn’t there a chemical breakdown or a hazard report or a history of the chemical? What the heck is dioxazine?

C is for Cadmium

Cadmium is an element and a metal that was discovered in the early 1800s by two German scientists. It wasn’t developed for use as a pigment until the mid 1800s, but has since proven itself to be a strong vibrant and reliable source of yellow through to red pigments.

B is for Blue

Blue is the colour of our sky and our oceans, both calm and turbulent, often streaked with grey or white, it envelopes our planet and gives our astronauts a blue marble to admire.

A is for Alizarin

In the foreground above you can see my Matisse Brilliant Alizarin. In the middle you can see my Golden Alizarin Crimson Hue. The colours are not the same. The equal to Golden in Matisse is the Deep Rose Madder that I have equally fallen in love with. My watercolours by Windsor and Newton have followed the Matisse preference for colour. So which of these is truly Alizarin?

Acrylic splat becomes a toucan

The biggest thing for me that I’m learning at the moment is to trust my skill. I have to believe that no matter what I do it will work out somehow. It may look like crud at some points, but if I keep going, I can make it work. I’m an artist, I can do this! (This is my mantra…and it is working :D).

Masking fluid experiments

Earlier this year I was introduced to the concept of an art journal. I’ve kept sketchbooks of my work all my life, but art journalling is slightly different. In March I started a journal of my own. A simple cheap bound sketchbook that within its pages I have permission to royally stuff up with abandon. I’ve been using it to experiment with my watercolours of late and that is where you will find all the originals for my Life Inspired series. I’ve found it extremely liberating to have this place to just play. I’ve never painted in a sketchbook before. All my paintings have been big events where I have tried to create something that will grace a wall someday. I can’t tear pages out of this book.